top of page

Lawson Vocal Studios Group

Public·13 members
Yefim Fedotov
Yefim Fedotov

2CAudio Aether: The Ultimate Guide to the Auto-Randomizing Algorithmic Reverb Plugin


2CAudio Aether Algorithmic Reverb VST RTAS v1.5.1 Pack AiR ASSiG: A Review




Introduction




If you are looking for a high-quality, versatile, and powerful native reverb plugin for your music production or sound design projects, you might want to check out 2CAudio Aether. This plugin is not just another reverb plugin; it is an auto-randomizing algorithmic reverb plugin that offers unparalleled precision, quality, flexibility, and realism in its reverb engine.




2CAudio Aether Algorithmic Reverb VST RTAS v1.5.1 Pack AiR ASSiG



What does that mean? It means that 2CAudio Aether can create complex and dynamic reverbs that are not based on static impulse responses or convolution reverb, but on a sophisticated algorithm that can generate random variations and modulations in the reverb tail, creating a more natural and organic sound. It also means that 2CAudio Aether can offer a high level of control and customization over the reverb parameters, allowing you to shape the reverb sound according to your needs and preferences.


2CAudio Aether is not a new plugin; it was first released in 2009 and has since been updated and improved several times. It has won many awards and accolades from professional users and reviewers, and has been considered a gold standard in native reverb plugins. It is compatible with both Windows and Mac OS X, and supports VST, RTAS, and AU formats. It can be used as a standalone application or as a plugin in your DAW of choice.


In this article, we will review the main features and specifications of 2CAudio Aether, and show you why it is one of the best reverb plugins on the market today. We will also provide some examples and tips on how to use 2CAudio Aether for different types of sounds and mixes. Let's get started!


Power. Precision. Versatility.




One of the most impressive aspects of 2CAudio Aether is its reverb engine, which is designed to deliver extreme precision and quality in its reverb calculations. 2CAudio Aether uses a 64-bit double-precision floating-point internal processing, which means that it can handle very large numbers with very high accuracy. This results in a very low noise floor, a very high dynamic range, and a very smooth frequency response.


2CAudio Aether also uses a modular feedback delay network (FDN) architecture, which is a type of algorithmic reverb that can create complex and realistic reverbs by using multiple feedback loops with different delay times and gains. 2CAudio Aether has a 16x16 FDN, which means that it has 16 feedback loops with 16 delay lines each, resulting in a total of 256 delay lines. This gives 2CAudio Aether a very high density and richness in its reverb sound.


Another feature that makes 2CAudio Aether stand out from other reverb plugins is its versatility and flexibility in its reverb design and control. 2CAudio Aether offers over 100 parameters that can be adjusted to shape the reverb sound, ranging from basic parameters such as decay time, pre-delay, mix, and damping, to advanced parameters such as modulation depth, diffusion amount, early reflections cascade, stereo width, mid-side balance, Q damping decay curve, space type, frequency profile, and many more. 2CAudio Aether also offers several macro controls that can simplify the reverb design process by offering predefined settings for different acoustic environments and tonal characteristics.


Furthermore, 2CAudio Aether offers several features that enhance its performance and efficiency as a native reverb plugin. For example, it has a smart CPU management system that can automatically adjust the CPU load according to the input signal level and the user interface activity. It also has a bypass mode that can completely turn off the plugin when it is not needed, saving CPU resources. It also has a freeze mode that can capture the current state of the reverb tail and loop it indefinitely, creating an ambient pad or drone sound.


To compare 2CAudio Aether to other reverb plugins and hardware units in terms of performance and efficiency, we can look at some benchmarks provided by 2CAudio on their website. According to these benchmarks, 2CAudio Aether can run up to 10 times faster than some of the leading convolution reverb plugins on the market, such as Altiverb or Space Designer. It can also run up to 100 times faster than some of the high-end hardware reverbs such as Lexicon PCM96 or TC Electronic System 6000. This means that you can use multiple instances of 2CAudio Aether in your projects without worrying about CPU overload or latency issues.


Auto-Randomizing Algorithmic Reverb




As we mentioned earlier, one of the unique features of 2CAudio Aether is its auto-randomizing algorithmic reverb engine. But what exactly is auto-randomizing algorithmic reverb and how does it work?


In simple terms, auto-randomizing algorithmic reverb is a type of reverb that can generate random variations and modulations in the reverb tail, creating a more natural and organic sound. Unlike convolution reverb or static impulse responses, which are based on fixed samples of real or virtual spaces, auto-randomizing algorithmic reverb can create dynamic and evolving reverbs that can adapt to different input signals and settings.


The benefits of auto-randomizing algorithmic reverb over convolution reverb or static impulse responses are manifold. For one thing, it can create more realistic and natural reverbs that can mimic the subtle variations and fluctuations that occur in real acoustic environments. For another thing, it can create more creative and expressive reverbs that can add movement, depth, and character to the sound. For yet another thing, it can create more efficient and flexible reverbs that can run faster, use less CPU and memory resources, and offer more control and customization options.


So how does 2CAudio Aether implement auto-randomizing algorithmic reverb in its algorithm and user interface? The answer is by using a combination of modulation and randomization techniques that can affect different aspects of the reverb sound. These techniques include:



  • Modulation depth: This parameter controls the amount of modulation applied to the delay lines in the FDN. It can create subtle or dramatic changes in the reverb tail, adding richness, warmth, or motion to the sound.



  • Modulation rate: This parameter controls the speed of modulation applied to the delay lines in the FDN. It can create slow or fast changes in the reverb tail, adding smoothness, shimmer, or flutter to the sound.



  • Modulation shape: This parameter controls the shape of modulation applied to the delay lines in the FDN. It can create different types of modulation curves, such as sine, triangle, sawtooth, square, or random, adding different flavors and textures to the sound.



  • Modulation phase: This parameter controls the phase of modulation applied to the delay lines in the FDN. It can create different degrees of correlation or decorrelation between the delay lines, adding coherence or diffusion to the sound.



  • Random seed: This parameter controls the initial state of the random number generator used for modulation and randomization. It can create different variations of the same reverb settings, adding diversity and uniqueness to the sound.



  • Randomize button: This button allows users to quickly generate a new random seed for modulation and randomization. It can create instant variations of the current reverb settings, adding surprise and experimentation to the sound design process.



All these parameters and features can be accessed and adjusted from the user interface of 2CAudio Aether, which offers a clear and intuitive display of the modulation and randomization settings. Users can also see a graphical representation of the modulation curve and phase on the main screen, as well as a numerical readout of the modulation depth and rate on the bottom bar. Users can also enable or disable modulation and randomization for different parts of the reverb sound, such as early reflections, late reflections, or global output.


Discrete Early Reflections Engine




Another important aspect of 2CAudio Aether is its discrete early reflections engine, which is designed to create realistic and complex early reflections for any input signal. But what are early reflections and why are they important for reverb?


Early reflections are the first echoes that reach our ears after a sound source emits a sound in an enclosed space. They are caused by the sound waves bouncing off the walls, ceiling, floor, and other objects in the space before they merge into a diffuse reverb tail. Early reflections are important for reverb because they provide information about the size, shape, and material of the space, as well as the position and direction of the sound source and listener. Early reflections also add clarity, definition, and presence to the sound source.


How does 2CAudio Aether create realistic and complex early reflections with its discrete engine and 33 space type models? The answer is by using a combination of delay taps, filters, panners, gains, modulators, dampers, diffusers, cascaders, splitters, morphers, inverters, adders, saturators, limiters, ditherers, faders, meters, soloers, bypassers, moversmuters. These are the building blocks of the early reflections engine, which can create up to 33 discrete early reflections for each input channel. Each early reflection can be individually controlled and manipulated with the above-mentioned components, creating a high level of detail and complexity in the early reflections sound.


2CAudio Aether also offers 33 space type models that can simulate different types of acoustic spaces, such as rooms, halls, chambers, plates, springs, ambiences, and more. These models are based on the physical properties and dimensions of the spaces, such as length, width, height, area, volume, surface area, absorption coefficient, reflection coefficient, diffusion coefficient, and more. These models can be used as a starting point for creating realistic or creative early reflections for any input signal.


How can users customize and fine-tune the early reflections with the cascade control and other parameters? The answer is by using the cascade control, which is a unique feature of 2CAudio Aether that allows users to adjust the amount of feedback and cross-feedback between the early reflections and the late reflections. The cascade control can create different effects on the reverb sound, such as increasing or decreasing the density, richness, warmth, or brightness of the reverb tail. The cascade control can also create different types of transitions between the early reflections and the late reflections, such as smooth or abrupt, natural or artificial, linear or nonlinear, and more.


Other parameters that can be used to customize and fine-tune the early reflections include the pre-delay, which controls the time between the direct sound and the first early reflection; the early mix, which controls the balance between the early reflections and the late reflections; the early width, which controls the stereo width of the early reflections; the early balance, which controls the mid-side balance of the early reflections; and the early damping, which controls the frequency-dependent attenuation of the early reflections.


True Stereo, Hybrid Stereo, Mid-Side, and Complex Stereo Modes




Another feature that makes 2CAudio Aether stand out from other reverb plugins is its support for different stereo modes that can affect the reverb sound and spatialization. 2CAudio Aether supports four stereo modes: true stereo, hybrid stereo, mid-side, and complex stereo. But what are these stereo modes and how do they differ from each other?


True stereo mode is the default mode of 2CAudio Aether, which preserves the original stereo image of the input signal and applies independent reverb processing to each input channel. This mode creates a natural and realistic reverb sound that matches the spatial position and direction of the sound source and listener. True stereo mode is suitable for most types of sounds and mixes, especially those that have a clear and defined stereo image.


Hybrid stereo mode is an alternative mode of 2CAudio Aether, which combines the left and right input channels into a mono signal and applies the same reverb processing to both output channels. This mode creates a more uniform and consistent reverb sound that fills the stereo field evenly. Hybrid stereo mode is suitable for some types of sounds and mixes, especially those that have a weak or undefined stereo image, or those that need a more subtle and transparent reverb effect.


Mid-side mode is another alternative mode of 2CAudio Aether, which splits the input signal into a mid channel (the sum of the left and right channels) and a side channel (the difference of the left and right channels) and applies independent reverb processing to each channel. This mode creates a more flexible and creative reverb sound that can manipulate the stereo width and balance of the reverb. Mid-side mode is suitable for some types of sounds and mixes, especially those that need a more dramatic and expressive reverb effect, or those that need to enhance or reduce the stereo width or balance of the reverb.


Complex stereo mode is the most advanced mode of 2CAudio Aether, which allows users to create custom stereo modes by using different combinations of input channels, output channels, feedback loops, delay lines, panners, gains, modulators, dampers, diffusers, cascaders, splitters, morphers, inverters, adders, saturators, limiters, ditherers, faders, meters, soloers, bypassers, movers, and muters. This mode creates a more complex and sophisticated reverb sound that can create unique and unconventional reverb effects. Complex stereo mode is suitable for some types of sounds and mixes, especially those that need a more experimental and innovative reverb effect, or those that need to create specific spatial effects or illusions with the reverb.


How can users switch between the stereo modes and adjust the stereo width and balance of the reverb? The answer is by using the stereo mode selector, which is located on the top bar of the user interface. Users can choose between true stereo, hybrid stereo, mid-side, or complex stereo modes by clicking on the corresponding icons. Users can also adjust the stereo width and stereo balance of the reverb by using the sliders below the icons. Users can also see a graphical representation of the stereo image of the reverb on the main screen.


What are some examples of using different stereo modes for different types of sounds and mixes? Here are some suggestions:



  • Use true stereo mode for sounds that have a clear and defined stereo image, such as acoustic instruments, vocals, drums, or synths. This will preserve the original spatial position and direction of the sound source and listener.



  • Use hybrid stereo mode for sounds that have a weak or undefined stereo image, such as basses, pads, or effects. This will create a more uniform and consistent reverb sound that fills the stereo field evenly.



  • Use mid-side mode for sounds that need a more dramatic and expressive reverb effect , such as guitars, pianos, or strings. This will create a more flexible and creative reverb sound that can manipulate the stereo width and balance of the reverb.



  • Use complex stereo mode for sounds that need a more experimental and innovative reverb effect, such as sound effects, atmospheres, or soundscapes. This will create a more complex and sophisticated reverb sound that can create unique and unconventional reverb effects.



Reverb Decay Time, Q Damping Decay Curve, Space Type, and Frequency Profile




One of the most important parameters that control the reverb sound is the reverb decay time, which is the time it takes for the reverb tail to decay by 60 dB. The reverb decay time can affect the perceived size, distance, and reverberance of the acoustic space. 2CAudio Aether offers several ways to adjust the reverb decay time according to your needs and preferences.


One way is to use the decay time slider, which is located on the bottom bar of the user interface. Users can drag the slider to set the global decay time for the reverb tail, ranging from 0.1 seconds to 120 seconds. Users can also see a numerical readout of the decay time on the bottom bar.


Another way is to use the Q damping decay curve, which is a unique feature of 2CAudio Aether that allows users to shape the frequency response of the reverb tail. The Q damping decay curve is a graphical representation of how the decay time varies across different frequency bands, from low to high. Users can adjust the shape of the curve by using four control points: low Q, low mid Q, high mid Q, and high Q. Users can drag these control points up or down to increase or decrease the decay time for each frequency band. Users can also see a numerical readout of the Q values on the bottom bar.


The Q damping decay curve can create different effects on the reverb sound, such as making it brighter or darker, warmer or colder, smoother or sharper, and more. For example, increasing the low Q and decreasing the high Q can create a dark and warm reverb sound that simulates a large and absorbent space. Decreasing the low Q and increasing the high Q can create a bright and cold reverb sound that simulates a small and reflective space.


A third way to adjust the reverb decay time is to use the space type and frequency profile macros, which are located on the top bar of the user interface. These macros are designed to simplify the reverb design process by offering predefined settings for different acoustic environments and tonal characteristics. Users can choose from 33 space type models and 33 frequency profile models by clicking on the corresponding icons. Users can also see a graphical representation of the space type and frequency profile on the main screen.


The space type and frequency profile macros can create different effects on the reverb sound, such as making it more realistic or creative, more natural or artificial, more spacious or intimate, and more. For example, choosing the hall space type and the warm frequency profile can create a realistic and natural reverb sound that simulates a large and reverberant hall. Choosing the plate space type and the bright frequency profile can create a creative and artificial reverb sound that simulates a metallic and resonant plate.


Over 600 Factory Presets and Add-on Expansions




Another feature that makes 2CAudio Aether stand out from other reverb plugins is its large and diverse collection of factory presets and add-on expansions. 2CAudio Aether offers over 600 factory presets that cover a wide range of categories and types


About

Welcome to the group! You can connect with other members, ge...

Members

bottom of page